My Road To Cicerone No. 2

“If you were going to make an American IPA using only German hops, which hop variety do you think you would choose for the flavor and aroma additions and why?” – Road To Cicerone German Beer Styles Course Discussion Question

The thing I love about The Road To Cicerone series are the discussion questions at the end of each unit.  On unit 3 about German hops the above is the question asked.  These questions are about getting you to really think about each subject in a way to help you truly understand how each part plays into the whole of beer and beer culture.

My answer is Hallertauer Mittelfruh hops for flavor and Tettanger for aroma.  The Tettanger hops will provide the familiar American IPA citrus and grass aromas. The Hallertauer will give the beer a nice spicey and herbal flavor with notes of cedar/leather/tobacco. That would provide an interesting taste alternative in a world of piney and citrusy American IPAs.

This and the other discussion questions not only highlight the different ways each of the four ingredients can be swapped in or out to affect the taste of the beer, it also highlights in a small way, what I think is the next wave of craft beer innovation in the US.

Brewers have spent the last ten years pushing the boundaries of beer making them hoppier, heavier, and boozier.  As the outer limits of those experiments are being reached the next step is the softening of the lines between styles and their traditional ingredients.

Home brewers (many of whom have and will become future brew masters) have long experimented with swapping ingredients from one brewing tradition into beer styles of another brewing tradition.  This breath of experimentation has created new styles or sub-styles like the Belgian IPA or black IPA.  Not only are traditional ingredients being shuffled around into different styles, ingredients that until now had not been used in beer or hadn’t been used in beer in a century are being brought back.  The next phase of growth in craft beer will see the blurring of styles and the creation of new ones.

One thing I am interested in, which is why the discussion question put my brain into over drive, is the reintroduction of the traditional European and noble hops into American style beers.  What does using Hallertauer or Fuggles do to an American IPA or a black IPA or an American style stout?  It goes back to how styles and traditions are blurring as long as brewers continue to try to innovate and find something new and don’t get bogged down into making and serving the same beers over and over simply because they sell.  As I’ve written recently, brewers should use their seasonal beers and special releases to experiment and see what works and what doesn’t.  That is the only way to find the next pumpkin beer.

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