My take

I often feel I am living outside the time I would have been more comfortable. I usually feel, not confused, but baffled at today’s Manichean (basically: everything is broken into good and evil) culture of the immediate. There is no subtlety or patience in today’s world. Maybe I’m wrong, but it seems when we couldn’t have almost everything we wanted the moment we wanted it, we may not have been happier, but we were at least smarter and more emotionally stable.

Let’s not get it twisted, the good ole days were not good for everybody. However, the leaders were problems had at least two things going for them: a respect and understanding of history, and the patience (often a short leash, but at least a leash unlike today) from their constituency to get things done.

What spurred this melancholy thought exercise? The front of SI.com asking whether Tom Brady’s legacy has been diminished. Maybe in the short term his 5 Super Bowl appearances with its 2 losses (both coming when the other team scoring with less then a minute left to win) will tarnish the Golden Boy image of perfection many fans (with the help of effusive sports writers) have constructed.

However, in 10 or 15 years when he is on his first Hall of Fame ballot and gets voted in, he will be remembered easily as one of the 10 (if not 5) best quarterbacks in the history of the NFL. Which is why most halls have a waiting period for selection. It gives voters and the public a chance to put some of the momentary hyperbole of the players career in historical perspective.

That is enough for now.   

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