Archive for February, 2012

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Posted in Uncategorized on February 26, 2012 by eightball

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Posted in Uncategorized on February 26, 2012 by eightball

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Last night’s game

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , on February 9, 2012 by cueball

As soon as Austin Rivers crossed half court with the ball, everyone watching knew he was going to take and make the last shot.  At least I did.  That is the part that gets me about last night.  He took it.  He made it. I didn’t get angry.  I expected to be angry or sad or any emotion in that spectrum.  Instead, I was just, “Heh.  That happened.”  

Maybe I was just stunned at the sudden end to what was a pretty good night up until the final few minutes.  Except, I’m still not emotional about it 11 hours later.  

That might come if UNC goes out and loses to Virginia this weekend.  That would mean they broke the rule to not let one bad loss turn into two or three.  

I think it might be that this season I see the UNC/Duke games outside the functioning of the season.  Sure, these games are occurring within the context of the season, but seem separated from the reality of the season.  They are similar to the final cavalry battle during the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg which had little if any impact on the outcome of the battle as whole and mainly is notable only for the introduction of George Armstrong Custer into the national consciousness.  

So, yes, I’m saying Austin Rivers=George Armstrong Custer.  So there is that.

My take

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on February 7, 2012 by cueball

I often feel I am living outside the time I would have been more comfortable. I usually feel, not confused, but baffled at today’s Manichean (basically: everything is broken into good and evil) culture of the immediate. There is no subtlety or patience in today’s world. Maybe I’m wrong, but it seems when we couldn’t have almost everything we wanted the moment we wanted it, we may not have been happier, but we were at least smarter and more emotionally stable.

Let’s not get it twisted, the good ole days were not good for everybody. However, the leaders were problems had at least two things going for them: a respect and understanding of history, and the patience (often a short leash, but at least a leash unlike today) from their constituency to get things done.

What spurred this melancholy thought exercise? The front of SI.com asking whether Tom Brady’s legacy has been diminished. Maybe in the short term his 5 Super Bowl appearances with its 2 losses (both coming when the other team scoring with less then a minute left to win) will tarnish the Golden Boy image of perfection many fans (with the help of effusive sports writers) have constructed.

However, in 10 or 15 years when he is on his first Hall of Fame ballot and gets voted in, he will be remembered easily as one of the 10 (if not 5) best quarterbacks in the history of the NFL. Which is why most halls have a waiting period for selection. It gives voters and the public a chance to put some of the momentary hyperbole of the players career in historical perspective.

That is enough for now.